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News of the Good

This week in news of the good, how one man is working to change the lives of many. 

Mr beast, Jimmy Donaldson, a YouTuber, with some 19 million followers, became famous for his “attention grabbing stunts.” The “stunt” that caught my attention this week is nothing short of miraculous: Mr. Beast bought the entire contents of a supermarket, ALL OF IT, to donate to homeless shelters. Take a look at the video below and see if it doesn’t bring a smile to your face.

 

Economic hardship and insecurity are one of the leading causes of stress, anxiety, depression, and suicide. A recent look at cab drivers in NYC by the NYT shows this most dramatically. While Mr. Beast clearly has the funds to make an impact on thousands of people, what if each of us helped just two other people? And then imagine if each of those people helped two other people. Just think how quickly the world could change. If that happened, where each person helped two people and those people helped two others, in only 33 rounds of that the entire population of the world would be affected. Can you imagine? That’s astonishing. And if that interconnectedness were used to say, donate a can of food or a dollar, imagine the impact. 

Take a moment and see if you can harness the power of your social network to lift a single person and to pay it forward. 

9 Tips for calming

Life is stressful. For all of us, life can be overwhelming, chaotic, hectic. To that, imagine that you’re a person whose experienced trauma, either attachment or event trauma. Imagine how this might affect your experience of the world. As a result of the trauma, you won’t feel safe, your nervous system will be activated daily, your body will feel like there’s always a looming danger. While your brain realizes no such danger exists, your body doesn’t have the same experience. This is an extremely effective safety mechanism. The human body has evolved to think of sticks as snakes, rather than snakes as sticks. The difference has kept people alive for millennia. While confusing snakes and sticks was necessary at some point in history, it is less so now. Instead, we now have to worry about actual and/or perceived threats from our surroundings, things like people, places, and thoughts, these are our snakes. And when we feel stressed, activated, angry, and irritable, our body is attempting to protect us; protect us from that perceived or real threat. This is the time that we “turtle up.” That’s when we feel protected and shelled. This is done by the vagus nerve. This is the nerve in the body that runs from our brain stem to every organ in our body, including our stomach. Knowing this, that it touches literally every organ in our body, gives us real control. What it means is that there are things we can do to help us calm our bodies when we feel overwhelmed. 

Social engagement: Reach out to a loved one, a safe person, or a safe animal. Remember safety is relative. The safety of the person or animal has to be safe for you. Make eye contact with someone. Touch someone. Hug someone. And for that matter, hug yourself. 

Name it: Naming your stress, threat, fear, anxiety helps to understand and calm. 

Safe space: Find a place that is calming, that is safe, that is known. 

Voice: Sing, hum, speak softly, chant, lullabies. Activating your vocal cords activates the system to calm.

Aroma: Whatever is calming to you. Things like the smell of your child, essential oils, and spices. 

Breath: The power of breathing has been known for millennia. The best breath work is 4-7-8: inhale for 4, hold it for 7, and exhale for 8. The exhale is the part that calms the vagus nerve. 

Listening: Listen to others, put down your things, and listen to what they say. Also, listen to music, any type of music that helps make you feel calm. 

Posture: Standing or sitting straight sends signals of well being. 80% of the messages in our body run from our body to our brain. Doing things to our body can make us feel safe and, as a result, calm. 

It’s not personal: our body feels under threat and remembering that this isn’t personal, but an unconscious response to a perception of a threat that is long-standing. 

Being is hiring!

Great news… Being is hiring!

Being is expanding and looking for independent contractor psychotherapists. Being offers inclusion on most major insurance panels, dedicated office space, an established presence in the community, support including EHR and billing, and the opportunity to work as much as you’d like. 

If you or anyone you know is interested, Please reach out to me at jeffrey@being-therapy.com. 

News of the Good

So often, we’re inundated by news of how the globe is dying, climate change is killing species, and we’re losing valuable land and ocean. This news is true. These are facts, regardless of what some want us to think.

At the same time, it is also true that there are those who are fighting to stop, if not reverse, this impending catastrophe. Along with the likes of David Attenborough, there are others, and in some cases, nations, that are also fighting valiantly for change. One such place is Colombia.

Columbia is home to Serranía de Chiribiquete, a tropical rainforest national park. It is home to thousands of species of flora and fauna, having the largest “rates of plant diversity in the northern Amazon.” In Serranía de Chiribiquete, one will find “lowland tapirs, giant otters, giant anteaters, woolly monkeys, jaguars, and the Chiribiquete emerald hummingbird, the only endemic species in the Colombian Amazon.”

In an historic move, the president of Columbia, Juan Manuel Santos, expanded the part from 6.9 million acres to an astonishing 10.7 million acres, making it the world’s largest tropical rain forest national park. To put that in perspective, that’s the size of Massachusetts and New Hampshire combined.

In a time when nature is becoming less accessible, even less available, and when more is becoming known about the importance of it for mental health, this stands as good news for both the globe and its inhabitants.

To learn more, click here.

Your Feelings Matter

new-yorker-feelings-barn
Borrowed from New Yorker. Titled Feelings Barn

Most of us grow up with experiences that tell us, either outright or not, that our feelings aren’t allowed. Perhaps you’ve experienced this at some point. Perhaps you’ve experienced someone – mother, father, partner – who suggested or actually said your feelings and emotions are invalid. It could be as simple as “boys don’t cry,” or “there’s no reason to be so upset.” Yet, there you are, upset and wanting to cry or be angry. This is the experience for most of us at some point.

It doesn’t have to be.

Your feelings and emotions are something over which you have no control. They are valid because you feel them and if you could control them, you would have long ago. Your feelings and emotions tell a story about how you feel. They are an invitation to not only know about yourself but also get closer to others.

Feelings and emotions are our way to know our true wants and desires and needs, to our true selves. If we listen to them, to the sadness or anxiety or joy, we can learn more about who we are. And the more we understand who we are, the more confidant and secure we are.

And not only are our feelings and emotions important to who we are, they are important to connecting to others. They are a way for others to get closer to us, to understand us, and to care for and about us. The vulnerability it takes to share them is the very thing that creates lasting relationships.

To learn more about unlocking the feelings’ barn, call today!

News of the Good

This week in news of the good, how one man is working to change the lives of many. 

Mr beast, Jimmy Donaldson, a YouTuber, with some 19 million followers, became famous for his “attention grabbing stunts.” The “stunt” that caught my attention this week is nothing short of miraculous: Mr. Beast bought the entire contents of a supermarket, ALL OF IT, to donate to homeless shelters. Take a look at the video below and see if it doesn’t bring a smile to your face.

 

Economic hardship and insecurity are one of the leading causes of stress, anxiety, depression, and suicide. A recent look at cab drivers in NYC by the NYT shows this most dramatically. While Mr. Beast clearly has the funds to make an impact on thousands of people, what if each of us helped just two other people? And then imagine if each of those people helped two other people. Just think how quickly the world could change. If that happened, where each person helped two people and those people helped two others, in only 33 rounds of that the entire population of the world would be affected. Can you imagine? That’s astonishing. And if that interconnectedness were used to say, donate a can of food or a dollar, imagine the impact. 

Take a moment and see if you can harness the power of your social network to lift a single person and to pay it forward. 

9 Tips for calming

Life is stressful. For all of us, life can be overwhelming, chaotic, hectic. To that, imagine that you’re a person whose experienced trauma, either attachment or event trauma. Imagine how this might affect your experience of the world. As a result of the trauma, you won’t feel safe, your nervous system will be activated daily, your body will feel like there’s always a looming danger. While your brain realizes no such danger exists, your body doesn’t have the same experience. This is an extremely effective safety mechanism. The human body has evolved to think of sticks as snakes, rather than snakes as sticks. The difference has kept people alive for millennia. While confusing snakes and sticks was necessary at some point in history, it is less so now. Instead, we now have to worry about actual and/or perceived threats from our surroundings, things like people, places, and thoughts, these are our snakes. And when we feel stressed, activated, angry, and irritable, our body is attempting to protect us; protect us from that perceived or real threat. This is the time that we “turtle up.” That’s when we feel protected and shelled. This is done by the vagus nerve. This is the nerve in the body that runs from our brain stem to every organ in our body, including our stomach. Knowing this, that it touches literally every organ in our body, gives us real control. What it means is that there are things we can do to help us calm our bodies when we feel overwhelmed. 

Social engagement: Reach out to a loved one, a safe person, or a safe animal. Remember safety is relative. The safety of the person or animal has to be safe for you. Make eye contact with someone. Touch someone. Hug someone. And for that matter, hug yourself. 

Name it: Naming your stress, threat, fear, anxiety helps to understand and calm. 

Safe space: Find a place that is calming, that is safe, that is known. 

Voice: Sing, hum, speak softly, chant, lullabies. Activating your vocal cords activates the system to calm.

Aroma: Whatever is calming to you. Things like the smell of your child, essential oils, and spices. 

Breath: The power of breathing has been known for millennia. The best breath work is 4-7-8: inhale for 4, hold it for 7, and exhale for 8. The exhale is the part that calms the vagus nerve. 

Listening: Listen to others, put down your things, and listen to what they say. Also, listen to music, any type of music that helps make you feel calm. 

Posture: Standing or sitting straight sends signals of well being. 80% of the messages in our body run from our body to our brain. Doing things to our body can make us feel safe and, as a result, calm. 

It’s not personal: our body feels under threat and remembering that this isn’t personal, but an unconscious response to a perception of a threat that is long-standing. 

Being is hiring!

Great news… Being is hiring!

Being is expanding and looking for independent contractor psychotherapists. Being offers inclusion on most major insurance panels, dedicated office space, an established presence in the community, support including EHR and billing, and the opportunity to work as much as you’d like. 

If you or anyone you know is interested, Please reach out to me at jeffrey@being-therapy.com. 

News of the Good

So often, we’re inundated by news of how the globe is dying, climate change is killing species, and we’re losing valuable land and ocean. This news is true. These are facts, regardless of what some want us to think.

At the same time, it is also true that there are those who are fighting to stop, if not reverse, this impending catastrophe. Along with the likes of David Attenborough, there are others, and in some cases, nations, that are also fighting valiantly for change. One such place is Colombia.

Columbia is home to Serranía de Chiribiquete, a tropical rainforest national park. It is home to thousands of species of flora and fauna, having the largest “rates of plant diversity in the northern Amazon.” In Serranía de Chiribiquete, one will find “lowland tapirs, giant otters, giant anteaters, woolly monkeys, jaguars, and the Chiribiquete emerald hummingbird, the only endemic species in the Colombian Amazon.”

In an historic move, the president of Columbia, Juan Manuel Santos, expanded the part from 6.9 million acres to an astonishing 10.7 million acres, making it the world’s largest tropical rain forest national park. To put that in perspective, that’s the size of Massachusetts and New Hampshire combined.

In a time when nature is becoming less accessible, even less available, and when more is becoming known about the importance of it for mental health, this stands as good news for both the globe and its inhabitants.

To learn more, click here.

Your Feelings Matter

new-yorker-feelings-barn
Borrowed from New Yorker. Titled Feelings Barn

Most of us grow up with experiences that tell us, either outright or not, that our feelings aren’t allowed. Perhaps you’ve experienced this at some point. Perhaps you’ve experienced someone – mother, father, partner – who suggested or actually said your feelings and emotions are invalid. It could be as simple as “boys don’t cry,” or “there’s no reason to be so upset.” Yet, there you are, upset and wanting to cry or be angry. This is the experience for most of us at some point.

It doesn’t have to be.

Your feelings and emotions are something over which you have no control. They are valid because you feel them and if you could control them, you would have long ago. Your feelings and emotions tell a story about how you feel. They are an invitation to not only know about yourself but also get closer to others.

Feelings and emotions are our way to know our true wants and desires and needs, to our true selves. If we listen to them, to the sadness or anxiety or joy, we can learn more about who we are. And the more we understand who we are, the more confidant and secure we are.

And not only are our feelings and emotions important to who we are, they are important to connecting to others. They are a way for others to get closer to us, to understand us, and to care for and about us. The vulnerability it takes to share them is the very thing that creates lasting relationships.

To learn more about unlocking the feelings’ barn, call today!

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