Quick contact: 651-456-8912 info@being-therapy.com

Kaonou Vue

Kaonou Vue, LGSW, LADC

Are you in early recovery or struggling with your addiction? Are there struggles in your family or romantic relationships, career, or self-care in your life? Are you experiencing depression, anxiety, trauma, or grief and struggling to manage your symptoms and heal? Would you like to have a deeper understanding of yourself, talk to someone in a secure place to process, reflect, and grow? As a therapist, I believe all clients are resourceful and resilient. I am here as a guide, resource, support, and tool to assist you humbly on your journey to reach your full potential.

I have an extensive history of working in the behavioral health field. My experience includes providing direct services to clients of all spectrums: Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity. I have worked with individuals, couples, families with co-occurring health, severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI), addictions, and trauma. My dedication is to helping and exploring with clients to understand themselves better and learn ways to cope with their stressors, feelings, and emotions. I engage in the relational approach in developing a meaningful client-therapist relationship and utilize various modalities in person-centered care in reaching your goals: Motivational Interviewing, Psychodynamic Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy, Brain-spotting concurrently with the social justice and cultural lens.

Education, Training, License, and Affiliations: 

N/A

“I believe in using an integrative approach to promote mind, body, and spiritual connections. I look forward to being a part of your journey of innovation, creativity, change, and healing.”

Ready to get started?

Use the form below or click on the scheduler button.

Emma Schneider

Emma Schneider MA, Therapist

   

As a human navigating this ever-changing world, it is my belief that we each hold knowledge, power, and peace within ourselves. However, it is fair to say that we don’t always feel this way.

I have experience working with adolescents and adults experiencing anxiety, shame, depression, life change, trauma, and individuals searching for mental and emotional wellness. My therapeutic goal is to hold space for you, support you, and help you enrich your life. My therapeutic vision is to convey “every day therapy for every day people”. I am committed to social justice and believe that larger social dynamics can influence a person’s mental health. I continually strive to have a validating space for all identities, and I advocate for anti-oppression on both community and systemic platforms.

My therapeutic approach is influenced by Narrative and Dialectical Behavioral therapies, somatic and mindfulness practices, and trauma-focused techniques. I focus on integrating nature-based practices in sessions, whether that means going on a walk, sitting outside, or planting flowers. My hope is to utilize the natural connections in our everyday spaces and environments to support holistic therapeutic healing. 

Education, Training, License, and Affiliations: 
 

Master of Science, Prescott College

View Emma’s profile: Psychology Today

Bianca Matter

I recognize that seeking a therapist can be a vulnerable act, and I respect you for taking this step. I encourage you to reach out to me if you think we would work well together! 

Ready to get started?

Use the form below or click on the scheduler button.

Self-Care and Mental Health

When asked about self-care, bubble baths, massages, or exercise often come to mind. While these are great examples, one of the key principles of self-care is missing: practice. To experience the benefits of self-care we need to practice it daily so it becomes an integrated part of our daily routine. It is especially important during times like these when we feel our external world is out of control. Fear and uncertainty have left us in disarray and disagreement. Let practicing self-care be something we can all agree on. The practice of self-care helps us regain clarity, contentment, and connection. Although it may seem impossible to add self-care to our already jammed packed schedules, it is important to remember the impact of habit. I recently read a book called, Atomic Habits by James Clear, recommended to me by a former client. According to Clear, “Habits seem to make little difference on any given day and yet the impact they deliver over the months and years can be enormous.” The daily practice of self-care creates a habit that positively impacts your life and overall wellness. If we do not prioritize ourselves, then what exactly are we doing? Skip the extra time scrolling on Instagram and more time Being. The practice of self-care lays the foundation of healthy habits that help us live more fully.

Lauren Paulson 
M.Phil.Ed., M.S.Ed,Therapist

 

Is This Normal?

What is normal? I often have clients ask me this question in an attempt to gauge their own symptoms. Is my level of anxiety normal? Does everyone fear social interactions? Do most people feel worthless at some point? Is my lack of motivation abnormal? These are “normal” questions but what do the answers to these questions really give us?

Does knowing how your symptoms compare to others make you less anxious, less depressed, less [insert symptom here]? These answers generally have no bearing on one’s own experience. Sure, it might give some immediate comfort to know others have similar experiences, but knowing that other people feel sad doesn’t make one’s sadness less present. Having the knowledge that others might ruminate less than you doesn’t make your racing thoughts stop. And being aware that others might also feel isolated doesn’t eliminate loneliness.

Instead of asking what’s normal, can we instead ask what is helpful? What is a behavior that is supportive of moving towards what is important even when feeling not so normal? Is telling myself that I’m socially inept and bound to mess up in a social situation helpful for being engaged with others? Is wrestling with the thought that I’m going to fail helpful for motivating me to try something new? Does thinking of oneself as abnormal improve feelings of self-worth?

So the question I pose back to clients is this: Are you willing to quit comparing yourself to others and instead try behaving in a way that is helpful for you, despite having thoughts/feelings/symptoms that might seem wildly abnormal?

by Dara Denton, LPC

Sentio, Ergo Sum

Cogito, ergo sum. I think, therefore I am. A phrase that first appeared in 1637 and was written by Rene Descartes. Descartes goes on to say, “we cannot doubt of our existence while we doubt….” What he meant was that as long as we are thinking, we are living. But are we? Is the definition of life, thought? Is merely pondering and fact-finding the highest form of life? Or perhaps a better definition is feeling, emotion, the things that often make life worth living? 

It wasn’t long after the utterance of those words that people started to believe less in what couldn’t be seen, but could be felt, and more in what could be thought, what could be known. The known universe, the place we call home, a spiraling expanse with, what appears to be, infinite space, has always been a source of wonder. Just look up at the stars on a clear night and try to stop yourself from being in wonder. Wondering if there’s life out there? Wondering how many stars there are? Wondering if we’ll find the end of space? It’s natural to want to understand and know. It’s also a far less magical place to know something as fact.

And now, in 2020, we’re stuck with a disconnection, a feeling of loneliness that pervades most societies and cultures. Was it just as a result of cogito, ergo sum? No, it wasn’t just that moment. And yet, that moment was significant in that it marked a place where we turned away from a spiritual connection to one of intellectual pursuit. 

Before we go further, it’s important to distinguish spiritual from religious. By spiritual, I mean connection. This can include religion but doesn’t have to. It’s simply a way to talk about being connected to something greater than oneself. Things like nature, groups, communities, family. These can all be spiritual. And it’s this, the spiritual, that’s lacking in today’s society. It’s also one of the most important tools that can help mitigate anxiety. 

According to researchers who examined 2,000 people, spirituality was one of the best tools to combat anxiety. “Of the participants who had a generalized anxiety disorder at some point in their lives, seven out of ten of them are now free of the disorder” as a result of developing a spirituality practice, the researchers concluded. What does this mean in real numbers? Of the 40 million people who currently suffer from clinical anxiety, 28 million could be anxiety-free. With no medication. 

And it’s free. 

So, Descartes says cogito, ergo sum. Perhaps a better phrase would be sentio, ergo sum. I feel, therefore I am.

To learn more, call Being today! 

Kaonou Vue

Kaonou Vue, LGSW, LADC

Are you in early recovery or struggling with your addiction? Are there struggles in your family or romantic relationships, career, or self-care in your life? Are you experiencing depression, anxiety, trauma, or grief and struggling to manage your symptoms and heal? Would you like to have a deeper understanding of yourself, talk to someone in a secure place to process, reflect, and grow? As a therapist, I believe all clients are resourceful and resilient. I am here as a guide, resource, support, and tool to assist you humbly on your journey to reach your full potential.

I have an extensive history of working in the behavioral health field. My experience includes providing direct services to clients of all spectrums: Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity. I have worked with individuals, couples, families with co-occurring health, severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI), addictions, and trauma. My dedication is to helping and exploring with clients to understand themselves better and learn ways to cope with their stressors, feelings, and emotions. I engage in the relational approach in developing a meaningful client-therapist relationship and utilize various modalities in person-centered care in reaching your goals: Motivational Interviewing, Psychodynamic Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Solution-Focused Therapy, Brain-spotting concurrently with the social justice and cultural lens.

Education, Training, License, and Affiliations: 

N/A

“I believe in using an integrative approach to promote mind, body, and spiritual connections. I look forward to being a part of your journey of innovation, creativity, change, and healing.”

Ready to get started?

Use the form below or click on the scheduler button.

Emma Schneider

Emma Schneider MA, Therapist

   

As a human navigating this ever-changing world, it is my belief that we each hold knowledge, power, and peace within ourselves. However, it is fair to say that we don’t always feel this way.

I have experience working with adolescents and adults experiencing anxiety, shame, depression, life change, trauma, and individuals searching for mental and emotional wellness. My therapeutic goal is to hold space for you, support you, and help you enrich your life. My therapeutic vision is to convey “every day therapy for every day people”. I am committed to social justice and believe that larger social dynamics can influence a person’s mental health. I continually strive to have a validating space for all identities, and I advocate for anti-oppression on both community and systemic platforms.

My therapeutic approach is influenced by Narrative and Dialectical Behavioral therapies, somatic and mindfulness practices, and trauma-focused techniques. I focus on integrating nature-based practices in sessions, whether that means going on a walk, sitting outside, or planting flowers. My hope is to utilize the natural connections in our everyday spaces and environments to support holistic therapeutic healing. 

Education, Training, License, and Affiliations: 
 

Master of Science, Prescott College

View Emma’s profile: Psychology Today

Bianca Matter

I recognize that seeking a therapist can be a vulnerable act, and I respect you for taking this step. I encourage you to reach out to me if you think we would work well together! 

Ready to get started?

Use the form below or click on the scheduler button.

Self-Care and Mental Health

When asked about self-care, bubble baths, massages, or exercise often come to mind. While these are great examples, one of the key principles of self-care is missing: practice. To experience the benefits of self-care we need to practice it daily so it becomes an integrated part of our daily routine. It is especially important during times like these when we feel our external world is out of control. Fear and uncertainty have left us in disarray and disagreement. Let practicing self-care be something we can all agree on. The practice of self-care helps us regain clarity, contentment, and connection. Although it may seem impossible to add self-care to our already jammed packed schedules, it is important to remember the impact of habit. I recently read a book called, Atomic Habits by James Clear, recommended to me by a former client. According to Clear, “Habits seem to make little difference on any given day and yet the impact they deliver over the months and years can be enormous.” The daily practice of self-care creates a habit that positively impacts your life and overall wellness. If we do not prioritize ourselves, then what exactly are we doing? Skip the extra time scrolling on Instagram and more time Being. The practice of self-care lays the foundation of healthy habits that help us live more fully.

Lauren Paulson 
M.Phil.Ed., M.S.Ed,Therapist

 

Is This Normal?

What is normal? I often have clients ask me this question in an attempt to gauge their own symptoms. Is my level of anxiety normal? Does everyone fear social interactions? Do most people feel worthless at some point? Is my lack of motivation abnormal? These are “normal” questions but what do the answers to these questions really give us?

Does knowing how your symptoms compare to others make you less anxious, less depressed, less [insert symptom here]? These answers generally have no bearing on one’s own experience. Sure, it might give some immediate comfort to know others have similar experiences, but knowing that other people feel sad doesn’t make one’s sadness less present. Having the knowledge that others might ruminate less than you doesn’t make your racing thoughts stop. And being aware that others might also feel isolated doesn’t eliminate loneliness.

Instead of asking what’s normal, can we instead ask what is helpful? What is a behavior that is supportive of moving towards what is important even when feeling not so normal? Is telling myself that I’m socially inept and bound to mess up in a social situation helpful for being engaged with others? Is wrestling with the thought that I’m going to fail helpful for motivating me to try something new? Does thinking of oneself as abnormal improve feelings of self-worth?

So the question I pose back to clients is this: Are you willing to quit comparing yourself to others and instead try behaving in a way that is helpful for you, despite having thoughts/feelings/symptoms that might seem wildly abnormal?

by Dara Denton, LPC

Sentio, Ergo Sum

Cogito, ergo sum. I think, therefore I am. A phrase that first appeared in 1637 and was written by Rene Descartes. Descartes goes on to say, “we cannot doubt of our existence while we doubt….” What he meant was that as long as we are thinking, we are living. But are we? Is the definition of life, thought? Is merely pondering and fact-finding the highest form of life? Or perhaps a better definition is feeling, emotion, the things that often make life worth living? 

It wasn’t long after the utterance of those words that people started to believe less in what couldn’t be seen, but could be felt, and more in what could be thought, what could be known. The known universe, the place we call home, a spiraling expanse with, what appears to be, infinite space, has always been a source of wonder. Just look up at the stars on a clear night and try to stop yourself from being in wonder. Wondering if there’s life out there? Wondering how many stars there are? Wondering if we’ll find the end of space? It’s natural to want to understand and know. It’s also a far less magical place to know something as fact.

And now, in 2020, we’re stuck with a disconnection, a feeling of loneliness that pervades most societies and cultures. Was it just as a result of cogito, ergo sum? No, it wasn’t just that moment. And yet, that moment was significant in that it marked a place where we turned away from a spiritual connection to one of intellectual pursuit. 

Before we go further, it’s important to distinguish spiritual from religious. By spiritual, I mean connection. This can include religion but doesn’t have to. It’s simply a way to talk about being connected to something greater than oneself. Things like nature, groups, communities, family. These can all be spiritual. And it’s this, the spiritual, that’s lacking in today’s society. It’s also one of the most important tools that can help mitigate anxiety. 

According to researchers who examined 2,000 people, spirituality was one of the best tools to combat anxiety. “Of the participants who had a generalized anxiety disorder at some point in their lives, seven out of ten of them are now free of the disorder” as a result of developing a spirituality practice, the researchers concluded. What does this mean in real numbers? Of the 40 million people who currently suffer from clinical anxiety, 28 million could be anxiety-free. With no medication. 

And it’s free. 

So, Descartes says cogito, ergo sum. Perhaps a better phrase would be sentio, ergo sum. I feel, therefore I am.

To learn more, call Being today!